Interactive Music Mapping Vienna – Research Project

06/06/2018 by Leonard Sprueth | 0 comments

Exploring a City. 1945 up to the Present Day

Lead by Susana Zapke, keynote-speaker at our conference in November, this research project tackles the role of music in urban context as an instrument of social identification and the question of how music is symbolically used in municipal politics. The city of Vienna hereby functions as an example to point out the ways music can be responsible for creating specific city spheres and ideological subjects.

In this manner, cultural and social practices are looked upon to identify the modus operandi of the city as well as its social dispositions. Vienna’s site-specificity will thereby be attributed to the acoustic-tonal construct inherited.

This particular research-emphasis was developed through the entanglement of scientific and artistic approaches and practices of diverse projects at the MUK Vienna since 2012.

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The Battle for the High Street – Book by Phil Hubbard

23/02/2018 by Alenka Barber-Kersovan | 0 comments

Hight streets in British cities often carry strong
meanings in terms of social an cultural status. In this
book, Phil Hubbard analyses their development in times of
recession and austerity and points out how high streets
are shown to have long been regarded as the heart of many communities, but have declined to a state where boarded-up and vacant retail units are a familiar sight.

The book provides a powerful argument against retail
gentrification, and a timely analysis of class conflict in
austerity Britain. It will be of great interest to
scholars of geography, social policy and cultural studies.

Phil Hubbard – The Battle for High Street, Retail
Gentrification, Class and Disgust

Palgrave Macmillan, London – February 2017

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Weekend Societies – New Book by Graham St. John

12/02/2018 by Leonard Sprueth | 0 comments

In Weekend Societies we are introduced to the emergent field of EDM (Electronic Dance Music) festivals and even-culture studies. Growing ubiquitous in contemporary social life, and providing participants with independent sources of belonging, these festivals and their event-cultures are diverse in organization, intent and outcome, EDM festivals are expressions of “freedoms” revolutionary and recreational.

Graham St. John points out an industry trend in the world dance music culture from raves and clubs towards festivals, featuring contributions from scholars of EDM festivals showcasing a diversity of methodological approaches, theoretical perspectives and representational styles.

 

 

Weekend Societies – Electronic Dance Music Festivals and Event-Cultures

Graham St. John – Bloomsbury Academic – 01.12.2017

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A Musicology for Landscape – New Book by David Nicholas Buck

03/01/2018 by Leonard Sprueth | 0 comments

As the title suggests, David Buck’s recent publication concentrates on weaving sound into the sensory appreciation of landscape. Through conceptual and direct reference on musical notation, his work investigates landscape architecture’s inherent temporality and calls for refocusing  this under-researched aspect provided by the model of notating time. 

Being a landscape architect and educator, Buck’s work offers an innovative and contemporary approach to a wide range of landscape projects and as the founder of the “landscape architecture programme” at the University of East London, his design work in the UK and Japan has been widely published. During his PhD he focused on the investigation of alternatives for perspectival representations of space in landscape architecture through developing new notations from a synthesis with music, thus “A Musicology for Landscape” is evidently the latest in a succession of thriving works.

The book hereby addresses a difficulty within the architectural discourse, which is concerned with a lack of adequacy of the existing design tools to correctly explore the landscape’s inherited temporality. By seeking new forms of notation through the inclusion of musical notation, the book introduces three influential composers – Morton Feldman, György Ligeti and Michael Finnissy – presenting a critical evaluation of their work within music, as well as a means in which it might be used in design research. David Buck then juxtaposes musical scores with design representations by Kevin Appleyard, Bernard Tschumi and William Kent, until final examination through newly developed landscape architectural notations. Ultimately, bringing together musical composition and landscape architecture through notation, evokes a focused and sensitive exploration of temporality and sound in both fields.

David Buck – between landscape architecture and land art 

A Musicology for Landscape – 2017 – Routledge

 

01/06/2017
by R. Kuchar
0 comments

New Book on Cultural Policy, Urban Music & Migration by Lisa Gaupp: Die exotisierte Stadt. Kulturpolitik und Musikvermittlung im postmigrantischen Prozess.

The book sketches the interaction between music mediation, cultural policies, urban popular music and identityconstruction in today’s complex societies. Likewise, this study reveals how a global transcultural youth culture is emerging and developing under the influence of institutional structures in … Continue reading